JOHN CHUCKMAN COMMENT: HOW USING QUOTES FROM FAMOUS HISTORICAL FIGURES CAN BE SOMETIMES MISLEADING – WHAT THEY SAID WAS NOT ALWAYS HOW THEY LIVED – ORWELL AND JEFFERSON   Leave a comment

John Chuckman

COMMENT POSTED TO AN ARTICLE IN INVESTMENTWATCH

Even George Orwell, the man the left always props up, felt strongly about the necessity for an individual to keep their firearm(s): “That rifle on the wall of the laborer’s cottage or working-class flat is the symbol of democracy. It is our job to see that it stays there.”

The author is ignorant.

Orwell had a rather mixed-stew of beliefs, and not all the components were things many would approve of today, especially liberals.

He is quoted widely on specific matters, and on those matters he wrote eloquently and with a correctness most accept.

But, for example, on the matter of Russia, Orwell came to sound just like a McCarthyite. Quite unpleasant. He demonstrated his willingness to betray people he regarded as dangerous “reds.” He kept lists.

Concerning Orwell and sexual matters – an area which is in fact very revealing of character, for sure – the less said the better. He enjoyed buying young girl prostitutes on trips abroad and even once begged his wife if she would object to him enjoying one on a trip they were taking together (the incident is recorded in at least two serious biographies).

Anecdotes of his relationship with women of his own age are not appealing, including one of his pretty much throwing a woman to the ground and jumping on top of her.

A similar, although even more extreme, example of the same phenomenon is found in Thomas Jefferson, a man Americans, especially of the Right, love to quote.

Yes, he penned a few eloquent slogans, but he also wrote and very much believed in things bordering on the ridiculous. There were strong elements of a tyrannical temperament in his beliefs and behaviors, and some would say his eloquent, frequently-quoted lines were a form of self-serving propaganda and image-manipulation for history.

And even the good things he wrote, Jefferson ignored close to completely when he actually had power, both as President and as Governor of Virginia.

He misused power and demonstrated hypocrisy and genuine cowardice on a number of occasions. His penchant, almost an obsession, for secrecy was dark and ominous. Jefferson, who loved being viewed as the perfectly enlightened man, was observed by one visitor to Monticello beating a slave quite harshly. The visitor recorded the incident for posterity.

Jefferson’s sex life also was not something that speaks highly of his character.

He started sleeping with Sally Hemmings when she was a 13-year-old girl, after his wife died. She was, of course, a slave child on his plantation. We have an affidavit from one of Sally’s grown children stating that Jefferson was his father.

Jefferson never in his lifetime, despite a plantation with over two hundred slaves, was able to earn his own living. He was a flop as a lawyer. His tastes and demands were extravagant, he borrowed money from friends regularly, and he died a bankrupt.

By the way, a talented yellow journalist of the day, Philip Freneau – someone Jefferson secretly hired when he served as Secretary of State to publish attacks against his boss, George Washington – later, feeling badly-treated by Jefferson, wrote of Jefferson’s dark side and died under mysterious circumstances.

It was said by some that Hemmings herself was the offspring of his late wife’s father, another plantation owner, something, which if true, suggests how ghastly the whole empire of slavery was. So, not only a slave, but Sally may have been his wife’s younger half-sister.

Never mind Jefferson’s “empire of liberty,” the reality of his entire life was an empire of slavery, right down to the time as President he actually assisted Emperor Napoleon in attempting to brutally put down the Hattian slave revolt.

Posted February 22, 2018 by JOHN CHUCKMAN in Uncategorized

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